48 hours with Google Glass

August 22, 2013 at 9:36 am

me-owen-glass

A couple weeks back I was able to borrow Google Glass for 48 hours, and I wanted to maximize my time – so besides sleeping (and showering) – I wore them non-stop. Even when my wife kept asking “Are you really going to wear those out?” and my kids saying “Where did you get those cool glasses!” (they still ask about them) – I wore them, talked to them, tapped them, and scrolled through the virtual interface floating in front of my face.

There is no better way to share something than with photos – so here are 48 hours of photos and videos from Glass:

A world without Reader

June 30, 2013 at 10:02 pm

google-reader-stats

My Reader stats say it all: “Since October 7, 2005 you have read a total of 247,468 items”. Or about 30k items a year, or 590 items a week, or 84 items a day. I may have a problem. But I’m not sure if that would be more or less if I read the paper every day. How many “items” are in the Dallas News on a given day?

Designing for Google Glass

April 9, 2013 at 9:30 am

During SXSW I was able to attend Timothy Jordan’s talk on designing and developing for Google Glass. I’m somewhere in here – a photo taken directly from Jordan’s Glass:

SXSW Crowd for Google Glass

Two things struck me from the videos that I’ve seen from Google’s promotional videos:

1) The 100% hands off view is not totally accurate, as you’re touching, taping and swiping the side of the Glass often, and 2) the “augmented view” is also not 100% what has been imagined from the movies or other early phone based, or game based augmented reality experiences.

A couple weeks with the pebble

March 20, 2013 at 3:26 pm

pebble watch

pebble watch
I got my pebble a day before SXSW Interactive. Good timing. It was a snap to setup, and with a single charge I was on my way.

There has been a lot about the “iWatch” recently – from Samsung confirming they’re launching a watch to recent posts around what we’d want out of a “iWatch” to current “smart” watch providers like Sony adding features as fast as they can.

Get to know Android for $100 or less

January 7, 2013 at 11:00 am

I came across an article from earlier in the year “The UX Community Needs to Start Paying Attention to Android” – and that got me thinking. WIth both Android and Windows Phone, I don’t dislike them on principle – I’m just happy with my iPhone. But neither really have an iPod Touch like version that’s cheap enough for me to play around with, while keeping my iPhone as my primary device.

Even with Google’s Android operating system running on 75% of the smartphones shipped in the third quarter of 2012 – Android has a usage problem. People are buying them as basic phones because the carriers are giving them away, but even with current low usage, I do agree that as Designers we should be aware of all platforms, and be able to design for them equally. And as passionate, curious individuals, we might learn something new.

Over the holidays I came across this:

HTC One V

A HTC One V, running Android ICS (which is currently the #2 Android OS by usage). It’s locked to Virgin Mobile for cell service, but unlocked as a wi-fi device. And there is no mandatory connection to cell service needed. Just switch it over to Airplane Mode, turn on the wi-fi and GPS, and you’re good to go!

So for $69 (Amazon deal-of-the-day at the time), I got a Android based iPod Touch, that I can play with online and off (as long as there is wi-fi around) – and I’ve been playing with it. I’m trying to replace my iPhone while at home, and I have to say it does a good job. Most of the apps I regularly use are available (I think I’m only missing Byline for RSS, and of course FaceTime), the OS is fast enough, and there are some interesting design details that I would like to see on my iPhone.

  • This is a great way to get-to-know a device, and learn its advantages and quirks.
  • And as a father of mobile device loving kids, this could also be a great replacement for an iPod Touch, at a fraction of the cost, and if it lasts – it could one day be a pay-as-you-go phone for your kiddo.
  • It also makes a great kiddo-camera – with easy ways to upload your photos straight from the camera.

So as pay-as-you go devices get down to second device level prices, now’s the time to take the plunge, and try to see if you can replace your device for part of your day. Do it for the love of Design.

Here are some current pay-as-you go deals to get you into a different Mobile OS:

$100 HTC One V (4.0 ICS)

$199 Nokia Lumia 710 (Windows Phone)

$70 LG Optimus Slider (2.3 Gingerbread)

$100 LG Optimus Elite (2.3 Gingerbread)

$169 Samsung Exhibit II (2.3 Gingerbread)

$99 Samsung Illusion (2.3 Gingerbread)

LTE made me do it…

December 1, 2012 at 10:17 pm

I was wondering if LTE on the iPhone 5 would change my mobile internet consumption habits. Here in the Dallas area I’ve seen speeds that just about equal my Verizon Fios service. And the below was without Facetime being enabled (still hoping it will come to grandfathered plans!).

I’m wondering what has changed? I can view more, faster? Not as timid about watching streaming videos on the go? Whatever it is, I’d be surprised as iPhone 5 usage goes up, the LTE network doesn’t start to drag. Guess we’ll see how it fares in Austin during SXSW next year :-)

Designing for Sensors 
& the Future of Experiences

November 29, 2012 at 9:00 am

Jeremy Johnson - Designing for Sensors 
& the Future of Experiences

This year at Big Design I spoke about Designing for Sensors 
& the Future of Experiences. This is something that’s near and dear to my heart as we move forward into an exciting time as Designers.

Will Fragmented Content Experiences Change your Home?

April 13, 2012 at 11:30 am

When you think about how people were entertained in their homes in the past, they would usually crowd around a radio or TV – which would be located at some central point in the home. Recently this has changed – with powerful, smaller, connected devices we’re able to fragment this experience. You have a home where everyone is on a different shared device, being more selective about the content they’re consuming – video, websites, games – all up to the individual, but still connected to their circles of family and friends.

Sound knowledgeable about moving your iOS app to Android in around 10 minutes

April 1, 2012 at 11:33 pm

As Android gains ground, iOS may not be enough for some brands. And with limited budgets and development constraints, sometimes you can’t give your app the full “Android Treatment” it should deserve. I’ve put together a mini guide to go over some common ways to get your iOS app over to Android, while keeping it consistent (mostly) with today’s Android patterns.

Gesture vs. Touch – observations from the Kinect for developers event

February 8, 2012 at 5:16 am

This past week I was able to speak to a large room of developers at the Gravity Center, who were all there to learn more about developing for Kinect. Which is really developing for sensors – of course Kinect development is much more exciting than sensor development :-) You could also say it’s designing for NUI – Natural User Interfaces, ways you’d expect to interact with interfaces if we didn’t have things like mice in the way. I was asked to speak, as a Designer (and the only one in the room) on the trends of Kinect interfaces, and give my perspective.